View Post

Why I Wrote a Book About Mountain Cedars

By: Elizabeth McGreevy I can’t tell you how many times people have asked me why I decide to write a book about Mountain Cedars. Also called Ashe Junipers, I first learned about these Texas natives as a child while attending summer camp in the heart of the Texas Hill Country. It was there that my memories became imbued with the …

View Post

Earth Day 2021

Protecting the Texas Hill Country Rainwater Refinery By Rachael Lindsey I like to think I was born a wildlife biologist. I grew up roaming the hills and hollers of Tennessee and Kentucky. Escaping into the woods after school, I tracked deer & rabbits, captured snakes & lizards, and searched streambeds for arrowheads. I dreamed of living wild, a dream I …

View Post

Podcast feat. Frank Davis

Don’t miss this informative podcast featuring Hill Country Conservancy’s Frank Davis and learn what you need to know about clean water in Central Texas. Click here to listen to the full podcast now!

View Post

Inspired by Nature

By Nicole Cirino Austin Market Coordinator REI Outdoor Programs & ExperiencesREI leading stretching exercises before the 2019 NTD on the VCT Fun Run. What a dream it is to be inspired by your work.   I moved to Texas three years ago. Having spent my entire life living in the Northeast, immersing myself into new landscapes was a thrill I dove …

View Post

Looking Back, Looking Forward

For this very special edition of Hill Country Conservancy’s guest blogger series, founding CEO, George Cofer reflects on the last 20 years of progress in conservation then passes the baton to incoming CEO Dan Eck who illuminates a path moving forward.

View Post

Learning to Share

In 1947, my grandparents, Amber and “Tex” Nalle, purchased 75 acres of thick, remote, cedar country along the banks of Lake Austin. Tex lovingly called Amber “Rabbit,” or “Bunny,” and it was said that everything Tex owned, Bunny ran, hence the name “Bunny Run.”

View Post

Four Winns Ranch

J ames Buchanan “Buck” Winn, Jr. was one of Texas’ most well-known regionalist artists of the mid 1900s. Also an accomplished sculptor, inventor, architect, professor, and pilot, Winn’s art can, to this day, be found in a multitude of cultural sites throughout Texas and beyond—most notably “The History of Ranching”, a record-setting 280-foot mural originally at the Pearl Brewery and …

View Post

Safe Mobility for All

By Hill Abel, Owner, Bicycle Sport Shop As anyone who’s had the opportunity to travel the state knows, there’s a lot going on, both culturally and geographically, in this enormous place that we call Texas. I’ve always been proud to call myself Texas-born, and with deep roots from both the west and east sides of Texas, I have a strong …

View Post

Lucy’s Story

Lucy was recently diagnosed with many serious health issues. Her doctor said that regular physical exercise and a healthy diet would be critical for her survival. But due to the pandemic, indoor exercise facilities no longer felt safe to her as she was now in a high-risk category. So, she turned to the Violet Crown Trail for her daily exercise. Now, thanks to …

View Post

A Summer of Adventure

A summer of Adventure – Hill Country Style by Cary and Will Dupuy At the end of May, the Dupuy family, like many families, was fed up. We were fed up with being cooped up in the house together, we were fed up with trying to figure out the different software programs for distance learning, and we were fed up …

View Post

God Bless Texas

By George Cofer Chief Executive Officer Hill Country ConservancyGeorge at Mustang Island I am very fortunate to have been born into an outdoor-nature-loving family. I have many fond memories of spending time on the beach in Port Aransas with my dad’s parents. I’m told Mom taught me how to swim by tying a small rope to my ankle and pitching …

View Post

A Time to Breathe

By Frank Davis Like those of many others, my life and my family’s lives have been dramatically altered by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is now cliché to say that we’re living inside the movie “Groundhog Day,” with each day a virtual repeat of the one before. On the worst of days, the repetition of spending each day at home with …

View Post

Poetry In Motion

Carolyn and Otis When I first rode horses on a trip to Bandera’s Dixie Dude Ranch in fourth grade, I didn’t know that I had just changed my life forever. I instantly fell in love with these majestic, loving creatures, and I was hooked on horses from that point on. Soon after returning home, I found a riding stable in …

View Post

Why are Trails so Important?

Why Are Trails Important? As a member of the Hill Country Conservancy family, you, like many of us, may occasionally find yourself on the Violet Crown Trail. Surveys in the Austin area show that trails are the most desired recreational activity. Why the popularity? You can use a trail at a time that works in your schedule. You don’t have …

View Post

The Art of Purposeless Purpose

From the comfort of my dining room table in this discomfiting time, I took a few minutes away from my computer screen and our new home office reality to consider the eloquent musings in the article “For the full life experience, put down all devices and walk” by John Kaag and Susan Froderberg. What a pleasure it was to read. …

View Post

These Unprecedented Times

In these unprecedented times, it can be especially hard to peel away from the 24-hour news cycle to focus on your health and well-being.  But, right now it is more important than ever to practice a bit of self-care to reduce your stress or anxiety and to stay healthy. The current Stay-at-Home Order does not exclude us from enjoying the outdoors, …

View Post

Keeping the Stars at Night Big and Bright

The artist Vincent van Gogh once said, “For my part I know nothing with any certainty, but the sight of the stars makes me dream.” If Van Gogh were alive now, would he feel the same way? Today, manmade lighting results in urban night skies that are hundreds of times brighter than they were in 1889 when the twinkling Milky Way inspired Van Gogh to paint The Starry Night. Today, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the overabundance of artificial light prevents eighty percent of Americans and one third of humanity from even being able to see the Milky Way.

View Post

The Texas Hill Country Was Home to Freedmen

When the Civil War ended in 1865, formerly enslaved people suddenly found themselves freed. As part of the Confederacy, Texas was home to thousands of slaves before the war, who worked in town as domestic servants or as farm workers on plantations. When freedom came, many flocked into Austin, seeking help…