Travis County now shielding more than 1,500 acres of wild Hill Country

By Taylor Goldenstein – American-Statesman Staff Updated: 11:29 a.m. Sunday, August 05, 2018 | Posted: 3:07 p.m. Saturday, August 04, 2018 It’s often much faster and less expensive than buying land outright, county leaders say. Travis County this week closed on a deal to conserve its third ranch near the Hamilton Pool Preserve, including Murphy’s, bringing the total protected this …

Conservation network reaches out to private landowners

The Texas Hill Country Conservation Network announced on Tuesday its receipt of a $5.15 million pledge from the Regional Conservation Partnership Program, part of the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. Formed in 2017, the network aims to promote and encourage conservation and sustainable growth in the Texas Hill Country, especially important as climate change promises increasing droughts and floods in …

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Burnet workshop provides landowners with information on conservation easements

BURNET, TEXAS – The Hill Country Conservancy, in partnership with the Hill Country Alliance, is hosting a landowner workshop from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, April 20, 2018, at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service office, 607 N. Vandeveer, Burnet, TX 78611. This workshop will focus on conservation easements—a tool available to help landowners steward and protect their land investment …

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Net-Zero Hero: George Cofer

Austin is green and we all want to keep it that way! As a community, we’re committed to reaching the target of Net-Zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, which will ensure a safe, healthy, vibrant Austin for many years to come. Here’s the story of how one person can make a difference.

BEST OF AUSTIN: CITY LIFE

After 15 years of planning by the Hill Country Conservancy, the first 6 miles of the Violet Crown Trail—which starts along Highway 290 near Brodie Lane and heads north to Zilker Park—opened in August.

Violet Crown design underway

There is no Violet Crown Trail parking lot near the trail’s first phase, which opened in August. Hanna Cofer, director of events and communication with the Hill Country Conservancy, which helped develop the trail, said HCC did not buy land for parking.