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Burnet workshop provides landowners with information on conservation easements

BURNET, TEXAS – The Hill Country Conservancy, in partnership with the Hill Country Alliance, is hosting a landowner workshop from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, April 20, 2018, at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service office, 607 N. Vandeveer, Burnet, TX 78611. This workshop will focus on conservation easements—a tool available to help landowners steward and protect their land investment …

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Recovering America’s Wildlife Act

Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (RAWA) is an exciting opportunity to provide substantial funding for the conservation of at-risk species of fish and wildlife. With this funding, Texas alone aims to gain over $60 MM annually for implementation of conservation activities. These dollars would be available to provide increased incentives to private landowners managing in favor of healthy habitats and ecosystems. …

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New Farm Bill to be finalized soon

The new Farm Bill will be finalized very soon. Hill Country Conservancy and its partners have played, and continue to play, a big role in ensuring passage of this important legislation. We frequently talk with elected officials on both sides of the aisle, to remind them of the important stewardship efforts of private landowners. Such efforts are even more critical …

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Ecotourism & Conservation

Economic viability is one of the greatest concerns for landowners of rural and agricultural land. Particularly in the Hill Country, it is especially hard to earn income from the land through traditional means such as livestock grazing or farming. This is in large part due to the generally poor, unproductive soils of the region. Everybody agrees that the rocky hills …

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Book Review: Attracting Birds in the Texas Hill Country

    Originally published in the 2017 Texas Birds Annual “Attracting Birds in the Texas Hill Country” is first and foremost a habitat management tool. However, being well suited to those that own and manage land for wildlife benefits, this book will also interest those readers interested in birding, natural history, and landscape ecology. This isn’t to say that it …

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Our Children are the Guardians of the Land

I was recently interviewed for a local news channel where the reporter asked me, “What should people do to help Hill Country Conservancy preserve land, water and wildlife?” To me, the answer was obvious, but I didn’t have the opportunity to really flesh it out at the time. My answer is that people need to get kids outdoors and teach …

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New Permanent Conservation Property: Lazy Bend Ranch

Since then, they have invested heavily in improving the land through selective habitat management and overseeding with native grasses and wildflowers. Today, thanks to more than two decades of stewardship by the landowners, it boasts a wide variety of native wildlife including imperiled birds such as Painted Bunting, Lark Sparrow, Rufous-crowned Sparrow, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, and Northern Bobwhite. The land also …

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Game Cameras: A tool to monitor diversity

Game cameras are an increasingly useful tool for landowners and managers. I have always enjoyed reviewing photos as landowners excitedly point out the “shooter” bucks visiting their feeders. I even share their concern and frustration when the camera captures a sounder of feral pigs hogging all the feed or rooting up a freshly laid food plot. These scenarios illustrate a …

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Fulfilling Our Promise to Future Generations

Many people know that the Hill Country Conservancy protects water, wildlife and working lands in partnership with private landowners, frequently using conservation easements. However, we are frequently asked what happens after a conservation easement is in place. Do we simply walk away, knowing that our job is done and the land will forever remain intact and healthy? Or, is there more that needs to be done to ensure that the land is truly conserved, forever?

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Now’s the time to sow your seed

March 10, 2017 Big Bluestem, Indiangrass, and Little Bluestem are three of the four tall grasses of the Great Plains. The fourth, not pictured, is Switchgrass. Big Bluestem, Indiangrass, and Little Bluestem are three of the four tall grasses of the Great Plains. The fourth, not pictured, is Switchgrass. Every landowner has areas of land they are looking to improve. …